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XXIO PRIME: Functional Luxury For Discerning Golfers

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Last week, we introduced many of you to XXIO, a relatively little-known golf equipment brand over here in the U.S., via their brand-new Forged irons.

Given the robust response to last week’s piece, we figured we’d give you a deeper look into XXIO’s offerings in the form of their PRIME line of clubs, which are also newly available.

In short, the PRIME line is as aggressively distance-oriented as any set of game-improvement clubs on the market. Everything about them is geared toward helping golfers hit the ball farther, more easily than before.

Here’s how that works:

 “Lightweight” Doesn’t Even Begin To Describe Them

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A lot of amateur golfers – especially older folks – are swinging golf clubs that are too heavy. That a certain amount of clubhead speed is needed to leverage the power of most high-end clubs – especially ones marketed as being the same as pros use – is a simple fact. Another fact: you probably don’t swing your driver at 120 miles per hour like J.B. Holmes does, or even 100 miles per hour, like some shorter-hitting pros and accomplished amateurs do.

Which is why some golfers will find XXIO’s PRIME clubs – especially the woods – a revelation. The company’s engineers have undertaken incredible weight-saving measures from the PRIME driver all the way down through the short irons, knowing that a club that’s easier to swing is easier to swing faster and easier to hit farther.

Take the PRIME driver for example. Whereas the shaft in your driver is likely 50 or 60 grams, the PRIME’s SP-900 graphite shaft is a mere 36 grams, despite measuring 46 inches in length. That means it’s a quarter-inch longer and two grams lighter than last year’s model. Even the standard grip is lighter at 23 grams, down from 25 in the previous model.

All these reductions add up to more clubhead speed and more distance. You’d like that, wouldn’t you?

Japanese Brand, Japanese Craftsmanship

As we explained last week, you probably hadn’t (or haven’t) heard of XXIO before because it’s primarily a high Japanese brand. But it’s related to the better-known Cleveland and Srixon; it just represents the premium game-improvement side of the company’s business.

Why should you care that XXIO is bringing its Japanese-made clubs to the American market? Because it’ll allow you to tap into the strong heritage of meticulous, almost obsessive craftsmanship that guides the best-known Japanese brands, beyond golf clubs.

Have you heard of the film Jiro Dreams of Sushi, about Jiro Ono, the 91-year old sushi chef who has been practicing and perfecting his craft for more than 80 years? Consider XXIO PRIME golf clubs to be the equivalent of “Jiro Dreams Of Birdies.”

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This high-quality craftsmanship shows up in the materials used in the XXIO PRIME line. The faces on the driver, fairway woods, irons and wedges are a titanium specially made for XXIO called “SUPER-TIX PLUS” and the shorter clubs also include fine-tuned tungsten weighting. In short, these are top-of-the-line golf clubs for players looking to improve their games, especially through increased distance.

Like the Forged irons, XXIO PRIME clubs will be available only through authorized XXIO dealers (full list available here). Here is the club availability and price breakdown:

  • Driver (10.5 or 11.5 degree, Regular or Senior flex): $849.99
  • Fairway Woods (15 degree #3, 18 degree #5, 21 degree #7): $579.99 each
  • Utility (23 degree U5, 26 degree U6, 29 degree U7); $379.99 each
  • Irons (#5-PW, AW, SW) $260 each / 4-club set (#7-9, PW) $1,039.99

For more info about the brand-new XXIO PRIME line, click here.

4 Comments

  1. Neil shaw

    December 13, 2016 at 1:48 pm

    They are quite expensive aren’t they at those prices

  2. Tim Gavrich

    December 13, 2016 at 2:19 pm

    Neil–
    Basolutely; that they are. XXIO is definitely one of those highest-end clubmakers, in that kind of spare-no-expense mold. It seems that they don’t roll new equipment out at quite the same pace as others, which tells me their clubs are positioned to be played as long as makes sense by their clientele.
    –Tim

  3. John mann

    December 13, 2016 at 5:24 pm

    quite unbelievable pricing.similar clubs built by cobra at much cheaper price especially for seniors

  4. Frank Gatazka

    May 9, 2017 at 11:40 am

    Yes, the price is high. That cannot be disputed. However, there is simply no comparison between these clubs and other US brands. If you are a senior golfer with a slow swing speed of 80 MPH or less (that is the target golfer for these), these clubs will be like a revelation to your game. They are super long and super easy to hit from the driver to the PW. Cobra? Not even close. Actually, in terms of Japanese Domestic Market clubs, these are a good value. Believe it or not, there are $2500 drivers and $5000 sets of irons over there (Maruman Majesty Prestigio for example). Also, in the US these clubs are marketed at a lower cost than the exact same clubs in Japan simply because of market pressure and awareness. Yes, they are expensive, but after you hit them, you may be tempted. I game the irons and I am glad I made the investment. Callaway V Series perform similarly to the XXIO woods and are similar in head and shaft weights. They are available for a fraction of the cost of these, but there is nothing to compare with the irons.

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